Mapping the Twinning Herbarium

My name is Sebastien Hardinger and I am a Master’s student in the Public History program at Northeastern University. As part of my internship with the Everhart this summer, I worked with Museum staff to begin mapping specimens from the Everhart’s Herbarium.  The Everhart’s Herbarium, a collection of plants, was

Continue reading

Fritz Scholder’s Spirit of Independence

As we exit these final weeks of summer, our country laments the conclusion of the months of Independence. Americans raise their glasses once more to the overthrow of foreign tyranny, the season’s last fireworks exploding in the heavens. Bald eagles soar over amber waves of grain. The Star-Spangled Banner yet

Continue reading

Coming Together Through Folk Art

Our world is full of so many different forms of art and cultural expression that our communities depend on for creative ways to bring us closer together. Folk and traditional arts not only provide us pathways of discovery to history and heritage but open us up to a unique experience

Continue reading

Reflecting on “Forming The Maslow Collection”

While The Maslow Collection, in its entirety, is comprised of about 600 works by 150 different artists, “Forming the Maslow Collection: A Reflection on the New York City Art Scene in the 80s and 90s” contained less than 40 works in total. Nevertheless, this exhibition provided visitors with the opportunity

Continue reading

Crowdsourcing in the Humanities: How You Can Help from Home

Crowdsourcing…what is it? According to The American Historian, crowdsourcing is the practice of obtaining information or input into a task or project by enlisting the services of a large number of people, either paid or unpaid, typically via the Internet. “When done well, crowdsourcing can result in widespread interest from

Continue reading

Mystery Object: What is it?

So we will admit, this object is a little odd. And to be honest, it stumped a few people at the Museum who were trying to figure out exactly what it was. But after a little research and a lot of digging, we finally have some answers. This mystery object

Continue reading

Object of the Month: May 2020

May’s Object of the month is a taxidermy mount of a young swan with an interesting history. The June 22, 1955 edition of The Scranton Times carried the following photo/caption:  Just over a month later, the same paper reported that tragedy had struck: “Baby Swan Dies of Indigestion One of

Continue reading

The Tulip Flower & Folk Art

With spring beginning to show it’s signs all around us, anticipation of the soon to be blooming flowers are certainly present in many of our thoughts. Tulips, a spring bloom, will be flourishing before we know it. The tulips name originated from the Turkish pronunciation of a Persian word meaning

Continue reading

Traditions at Home: Pysanky

Easter 1990. This is me at 7, sitting in front of a coal stove in the basement of my grandparents house in Northeastern Pennsylvania. I learned the traditional folk art of Ukrainian egg decorating, or Pysanky, from my grandmother over 30 years ago.  Pysanky, meaning “to write”, is a centuries

Continue reading

So What Exactly is Visible Storage?

Did you know that most museums have less than 5% of their collection on display for the public? The Everhart Museum has approximately 18,000 objects in its collection. Of that, the Museum displays up to 1,000 objects, which means that a little less than 6% of the entire collection can

Continue reading