2011 Exhibitions

John & Yoko: A New York Love Story

February 4 – April 4, 2011 in Gallery 13

In November 1980 on the eve of John Lennon’s untimely death, photographer Allan Tannenbaum had unique and total access to John Lennon and Yoko Ono who were emerging from five years of seclusion and avoidance of the media. As one of the few photographers with whom the couple was close, Tannenbaum captured many intimate moments between the two, photographs they cherished. Following John’s shocking murder on December 8, 1980, Tannenbaum continued to photograph Yoko, as well as the vigils and memorials that sprang up throughout New York City. Additional images from John’s last public performance in 1975 made this Gallery 13 exhibit both a tribute to one of our greatest artists, as well as a celebration of a public and private love.


“With bullets singing all around me”: Regional Stories of the Civil War

February 4 – July 17, 2011 in the Maslow Galleries

The American Civil War was a defining moment for a young nation and its people, both free and enslaved. Throughout Northeast Pennsylvania and New York’s Southern Tier, no one was left untouched by the cataclysmic events of 1861-1865. “With bullets singing all around me”: Regional Stories of the Civil War focused on the War’s impact on people from this region, including the Museum’s founder, Dr. Isaiah Fawkes Everhart, who served as a field surgeon with the 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry. Partnering with regional historical societies and private collectors, the Everhart’s multi-disciplinary exhibit explored individual stories from both the battlefield and the home front. One of the exhibit’s highlights was items owned and used by Dr. Everhart.

Financial assistance for this exhibit was provided by Gertrude Hawk Chocolates, Inc., Joseph & Lisa Curtin, and Penn Security Bank & Trust Co.


Medics in Action: Caring for the Wounded

February 4 – July 17, 2011 in Gallery ONE

Medics in Action: Caring for the Wounded was a community-based Gallery One project highlighting the experiences of medics and medical personnel serving in the military both at home and in many of the recent historical conflicts. These individuals either hailed from or were trained in Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Exhibit partners included Misericordia University staff and alumni, along with local veterans.


An American Landscape: The 150th Anniversary of the Civil War

July 21 – September 5, 2011 in Gallery 13

An American Landscape: The 150th Anniversary of the Civil War was Andrew Lichtenstein’s journey to find meaning in history and memory. For the past few years, he documented Civil War reenactors in both the North and Southern states, as well as explored the current state of the Civil Rights Movement 50 years after the Voting Rights Act. Andrew Lichtenstein spent the last two decades covering long-term stories of social concern in the United States and is currently a member of Facing Change: Documenting America (FCDA), a collective of writers and photographers inspired by the Farm Security Administration photography project of the Great Depression. Lichtenstein spent eight years documenting the rise of the prison industrial complex after receiving an Open Society Institute Fellowship in 2000. In 2007, he authored Never Coming Home, a book documenting the funerals for American soldiers killed in Iraq. His work, exhibited around the world, has been published in many magazines and newspapers, including Time, Newsweek, US News and World Report and The New York Times.


Nights of 9/11

September 11 – October 24, 2011 in Gallery 13

Artist, photographer and pilot Hale Gurland crafts large-size sculptures by welding metal. On September 11, 2001 and in the days that followed, he contributed to the rescue/recovery effort at Ground Zero in New York, cutting steel using his tanks, torches and skill. His black and white images recalling Brueghel’s Inferno were shot on just five rolls of film on those first few nights. As a trusted volunteer he had unbridled access; no media were ever allowed on the “pile.” These never-before-seen photographs from Ground Zero were the subject of Nights of 9/11 commemorating the 10th anniversary of that event. The exhibit was developed in collaboration with Contact Press Images of New York & Paris and was funded in part by PNC Bank and the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority.

The exhibit was developed in collaboration with Contact Press Images of New York & Paris and was funded in part by PNC Bank and the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority.


Buds, Blooms & Berries: Plants in Science, Culture & Art

August 12 – December 31, 2011 in the Maslow Galleries

Where would we be if we didn’t have plants? Plants are undeniably important to every living creature on Earth. Food, shelter, health, culture, and art are all dependent on the use of plants, both in tangible and figurative ways. Buds, Blooms & Berries: Plants in Science, Culture & Art was a multi-disciplinary exhibit highlighting the Everhart Museum’s scientific collections and its historic Twining Herbarium, ethnographic materials depicting plants and trees, and contemporary art reflecting how botanicals impact today’s societies and mindset. Plants are an important element of the world’s ecosystem, producing oxygen, consuming carbon dioxide, providing nourishment and aesthetic inspiration, as well as the function for human and animal shelter and tools around the world. Plants are also some of the earliest living things as represented by fossils in the Museum’s permanent collection. 

Lenders to the exhibit included the Lackawanna Historical Society, Luzerne County Historical Society, Lycoming County Historical Society, and The Maslow Collection, private collectors, as well as the participating artists listed below. Unique elements of the project include an ephemeral wall drawing by Gabrielle Senza and an outdoor Pollinator Garden with plants donated by The Lands at Hillside Farms.

Contemporary artists whose work was displayed in the exhibit included: Marc Dennis, Philip Dente, Fritz Dietel, Ula Einstein, Lauren Fensterstock, Tom Herman, Patricia Johanson, Sue Johnson, Chet Kalm, Linda Kindler Priest, Amanda Knowles, Allen Linder, Joan Linder, Beth Lipman, Elizabeth McDevitt, Briony Morrow-Cribbs, Barbara Roux, Simone Rowat, Gabrielle Senza, Justine Smith, Emma Stein, Merrill Steiger, Jim Toia, Joyce Ellen Weinstein, Roberta & David Williamson, and Tom Zetterstrom.

Financial assistance for this exhibit was provided by Gertrude Hawk Chocolates, Inc.


Sowing Seeds in the Neighborhood: Laurie’s Community Garden

August 12 – December 31, 2011 in Gallery ONE

Sowing Seeds in the Neighborhood illustrated the story of a community garden, located just a few blocks away from the Everhart Museum. Managed by Shalom Scranton, Laurie’s Community Garden is comprised of a committed group of members who come from all walks of life and have a shared interest in sowing green space in Scranton’s urban landscape. The gardeners highlighted in this Gallery One exhibit have different personal backgrounds and participate in this garden for a multitude of reasons, including interests in organic gardening, locavorism (supporting food that is locally produced), community engagement and local green development.